Hey, sometimes actions speak louder than words fonts. And if you really, really like Comic Sans, then you're going to love this. In the name of art, a gentleman named Jesse England has designed the "Sincerity Machine," a Comic Sans typewriter. England says he altered the machine to write in the internet's favorite typeface because, well, there was nothing stopping him from doing so. But he does want everyone to know that, while creating it, he realized the font doesn't deserve all the negative flack it gets. At any rate, England was kind enough to detail how he built the Sincerity Machine, in case anyone else is interested in making one for themselves. Don't worry, we won't judge you.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Phone Talkin

Two-factor authentication might be all the rage these days, but it sounds like there could be an even more secure way of protecting against fraud -- your voice. It's being employed by major banks including Wells-Fargo and JPMorgan Chase to weed out scammers who call financial institutions armed with the info gleaned from cyber attacks, according to the Associated Press. The system combines recorded voice samples with blacklists of repeat calls from would-be criminals, and has reduced fraud attempts by as much as 90 percent so far. And if you're wondering where the banks have gotten these 65 million-plus voice samples, well, we've all likely heard the familiar notice that a call may be monitored or recorded before being connected to an operator. So, that explains that.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Remember those two European satellites that went spectacularly off-course in August? Well, it turns out that the reason the vessels entered into the wrong orbit was due to frozen fuel lines. Space Travel reports that pipes containing the Russian Soyuz rocket's (which put the satellites into space) propellent were placed too close to some pretty frigid helium lines, which in turn restricted the flow of fuel to a pair of altitude control thrusters and subsequently caused a lack of power. The good news is that this "design flaw" is apparently fixable easily and immediately for future missions. That won't help the Galileo GPS satellites for now however, because they don't have enough fuel to reach the intended orbit. Assuming there's enough money to go around there's always next time, at least.

0 Comments

Hatsune Miku, also known to some people as Miku Hatsune, is already a sensation in her native Japan. But now she's taking her vocal talents to other parts of the world, including none other than the US. The virtual pop start appeared last night on the Late Show with David Letterman, where she performed her single "Sharing the World" in full hologram form. While the J-pop singer is well known in The Land of the Rising Sun, it's interesting that Hatsune's character, created by software developer Cryptone Future Media, is now showing up in mainstream media programs Stateside -- especially one as big as Letterman's late-night show. You can check out the performance in the video after the break.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Outside of goofy newscasters referencing The Jetsons and Back to the Future 2, flying cars don't get much airtime these days. The concept is far from dead, but similarly distant from viable reality: simply put, it's too expensive of an idea to exist as a consumer product with modern technology. Slovakian company AeroMobil disagrees, and its third prototype is ready to be shown to the world this October 29th at the Pioneers Festival in Austria. The device is still in prototype form, but the folks at AeroMobil previously demonstrated their ability to achieve flight with a car (a video of AeroMobil 2.5 is below).

It's far from elegant -- the wings fold into the backseat behind the driver, and the car itself (at least the prototype) isn't much of a looker -- but it does work. The prototype holds two people, and allegedly flies up to 430 miles (540 if you're driving); it also reportedly runs on standard gasoline (the Rotax engine inside takes 91 octane -- the fancy stuff). No word on pricing or availability just yet, but it looks like AeroMobil is another major step closer to its bizarre, bizarre dream becoming reality. Seriously, watch the video below and you'll understand.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

It might take some time before space taxis become the real deal. Yet, that doesn't take away from the fact they're extraordinarily amazing in their current stage. One of the most well-known programs is, of course, NASA's Orion capsule, which has been in development for a few years now. Obviously, putting Orion through its paces is key for the space administration. So, what you see above is a test model of the spacecraft while it floats inside the USS Anchorage, a US Navy ship. Reuters snapped the image after Orion was found during a recovery test near the Californian coast, as NASA prepares by simulating different scenarios ahead of the capsule's first official unmanned launch.

[Image credit: Reuters/Mike Blake]

0 Comments

This recent file picture shows a bullet train 500-

The bullet train is a Japanese trademark. It is, in other words, a landmark in motion. Today, 50 years to the time it made a trip for the first time, between Tokyo and Osaka, Japan is celebrating a major milestone in the history of its beloved bullet-shaped train. The Shinkansen, as it's known in The Land of the Rising Sun, has had a great run throughout its 50-year tale, like being the fastest high-speed train at one point -- China's CRH380A now holds that title. Even so, Shinkansen is still responsible for carrying more than 300 million passengers every year in Japan, making it one of the most important forms of transportation in the world, not only in its home soil.

[Image credit: AFP/Getty Images]

0 Comments

Gizmo Vaping e-Cigarette Mod

There is a rapidly growing subculture of e-cigarette users across the globe who spend countless hours tricking out their hardware. Vape modding, as it's known, blends technical craftsmanship, engineering creativity and artistry into one -- and unbeknownst to most, it originated right here in the UK. Some do it to get better hits, while others do it to give their e-cigs a unique look. The modders are also the staunchest of users, who credit vaping with allowing them to kick the tobacco habit. But as I found out, through the process of modding, these ex-smokers may have just traded one addiction for another.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

variety of thai food in fresh market, Asia, Thailand

The authenticity of native eats can vary from generation to generation, or country to country if you're eating in a place different than where a dish was originally created. But that's not to say there aren't cases in which things are cooked and made the right way. Thailand, as you're likely aware, is home to some delicious food, and the government now wants to make sure that its most popular dishes are being represented well. To do so, "e-Delicious," a robot capable of tasting food and making sure it meets various quality standards, was built. The idea came from Thailand's Prime Minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, as she became interested in fighting against bad Thai food in Thailand and elsewhere across the world.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

Jenny Holzer's

It's safe to say that surveillance technology had a profound effect on American culture, even before Edward Snowden's leaks arrived -- there's a sense that you can never really escape the government's eye. If you've ever shared that feeling, you'll be glad to hear that there's finally an art exhibition devoted to exploring high-tech monitoring. The Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art's newly opened Covert Operations is full of projects that not only protest data collection, but sometimes use it to drive their points home. Jenny Holzer's Ribs (above) streams real US government documents on its LED displays. Hasan Elahi's Tracking Transience, meanwhile, uses selections from an online collection of 70,000-plus photos and location info as a sort of challenge; he wants you to mimic an FBI agent trying to piece together his life. If you're interested in seeing any of these projects first-hand, you'll want to swing by the Arizona-based museum no later than January 11th.

[Image credit: Richard-Max Tremblay / Jenny Holzer]

0 Comments

After running a successful initial round of crowdfunding, The Oatmeal is now looking to put the finishing touches on its plans to build a Nikola Tesla Museum. To do so, it needs a bit more help from kind souls on the internet. Despite hitting the goal amount on Indiegogo a couple of years ago, and having since received an unexpected, hefty donation from Tesla CEO Elon Musk, additional money is needed to start the actual building process on the property, one that was bought with the $1.37 million originally raised. In an effort to make things interesting, this new campaign offers to give contributors engraved bricks in exchange for their hard-earned cash -- the more you donate, the bigger brick you're going to have at the museum. But hurry because, as The Oatmeal points out, the sooner you back the project, the better location your brick will get. Eventually, the idea is to build the Nikola Tesla Museum on the land where his final lab was located, in Shoreham, New York.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

As neat as your smartwatch is, there are other existing wearables which, you know, can actually make the world a world a better place -- though that's not to say whatever you have on your wrist now is useless and for pure vanity purposes. Aptly named the Wearable Artificial Kidney, a projected started back in 2008, this medical gadget hopes to make the dialysis process better for patients, thanks in particular to its portability features. As opposed to the more traditional, stationary machines found at hospitals or in homes, which tend to be extremely heavy, the current version of WAK weighs a mere 10 lbs (around 4.5 kg.) and can be attached around a person's waist.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

US Navy drone flies two days straight using liquid hydrogen tank

Much has changed since the Federal Aviation Administration decided to start testing drones in the US for the first time. Part of that is due to the growing interest in UAVs over recent months, not only from hobbyists, but also from major technology companies including Amazon, Facebook and Google. There's certainly potential for a great deal of congestion in the skies in the near future, but the FAA doesn't believe its upcoming NextGen control system is ready to handle all the forecasted traffic from commercial drones -- not yet, at least. "We didn't understand the magnitude to which (drones) would be an oncoming tidal wave, something that must be dealt with, and quickly," FAA Assistant Administrator Ed Bolton told the Associated Press.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments

If you're a resident of The Big Apple, or have ever visited, then you know that subway platforms are filled with advertisements -- even some of the cars are completely wrapped in them. This is where a new app called No Ad comes in. Built by Re+Public, a team which focuses on using technology to "alter the current expectations of urban media," No Ad is an augmented reality application that replaces ads on the New York City subway system with art. It's simple, really. All you have to do is download the app, available for iOS and Android, fire it up, point your device at an advertisement and, just like that, you'll see a piece of art show up where you would otherwise see corporate propaganda. As it stands, Re+Public has turned 100 ads across the NYC subway compatible with the No Ad app, with 50 artists contributing their work to the project. We have a hunch Don Draper wouldn't like this idea too much -- but let's face it, he's probably too drunk to care.

Read the Full Story | 0 Comments