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I'm a late Wednesday afternoon tweeter. It's not a characteristic I'd necessarily include on any of my dating app profiles, but it accurately sums up my online behavior nonetheless. I'm also a tremendous neurotic (which should come as no surprise to anyone who knows me well) who embraces self-expression, challenges and change. I'm that personality pie chart you see up above. I'm an open book, or at least my Twitter profile is to IBM.

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You don't need a fancy current-gen console to stream all those Sony classics -- the company announced last night that its Netflix-esque PlayStation Now open beta is finally, well, open to PlayStation 3 owners in the United States and Canada. It's about time, really: PS3 owners have been part of the more selective closed beta program since January, but Sony opened the early access gates to folks with PlayStation 4s first. As always, though, be sure to keep a few things in mind before you take the plunge. You'll get access to some 150 PS3 titles as part of the deal (including forthcoming hits like inFAMOUS and Ultra Street Fighter IV) but rental prices for these games tend to range between $3 and $20. That span isn't awful, but considering you'd be able to pick up physical copies of some of those games for about the same price, you'll have to think about just how valuable picking up new games while immobile on the couch really is.

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Microsoft To Acquire Maker Of Popular Minecraft Game For 2.5 Billion

Microsoft announced this week that it's buying hugely popular game franchise Minecraft for $2.5 billion. For that money, Microsoft gets rights to the game and ownership of its Stockholm, Sweden-based development studio, Mojang. It doesn't retain the company's founders or Minecraft's infamously outspoken creator, Markus "Notch" Persson.

Does that sound like a lot, $2.5 billion? Well, it is in human dollars, but not so much when you're Microsoft and you've got $85 billion in "cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments." Regardless of the fact that this week's deal only cost Microsoft around 3 percent of the money it has on-hand, here's the real kicker (in the form of a statement from Microsoft): "Microsoft expects the acquisition to be break-even in FY15 on a GAAP basis." Woof, that's a doozy of a sentence right there.

Here's the translation: Microsoft expects the purchase of Minecraft/Mojang to have made back the $2.5 billion it cost by July 1, 2015. And that is why Microsoft bought Minecraft.

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AT&T isn't the only carrier not getting WiFi calling until 2015 -- a certain red-branded network's iPhone 6 and 6 Plus won't, either. Speaking at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Media, Communications and Entertainment Conference, Verizon's CFO Fran Shammo said that his company has some back-end work to finish up before the feature goes live. This is something he predicts should happen around halfway through next year. What's more, he said that WiFi calling was never a top priority, either, as spotted by FierceWireless.

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After a year of development and another year on life support, Clang -- the sword-fighting game from science fiction writer Neal Stephenson and Subutai games -- is finally dead. Thing started off well enough after it topped its $500,000 crowdfunding goal on Kickstarter and an early beta was released to Steam. But a year later the Kickstarter cash ran out and Stephenson, reduced to working part-time on the project, said that the prototype "wasn't very fun to play." With no more cash to improve it, Clang has now been terminated, though Kickstarter investors can receive a refund on request. Stephenson accepted part of the blame in the final update post, adding that the story of the failure could fill a book. In fact, he did write a short book about it, which may eventually get published -- we imagine that would be far more interesting than the game itself.

[Image credit: Subutai Corp.]

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FRANCE-LOGO-YOUTUBE

Google has gone on record as saying it loves original YouTube content like Epic Rap Battles of History, and now it looks as though the outfit is doubling down on such. How so? Well it seems that its fully-stocked studio spaces for partners are just the beginning. YouTube is investing millions into its partner channels, according to Recode. And it's part of a more concerted push into different types of content, replete with varying lengths and formats, too. That includes partnering with Hollywood producers, according to Recode's sources, which naturally gives Google something to sell. The wording on head of YouTube Originals Alex Carloss' blog post makes it sound like the firm's existing pool of talent will be commissioned to do new shows -- albeit with a heavier infusion of cash than they're used to. It sounds like it could be a solid deal for everyone involved: affording content creators more money for their work and pushing YouTube's hopes of becoming a more TV-like experience another step closer to reality.

[Image credit: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images]

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Google Maps can now tell more people whether to turn left or right at the next intersection, now that the Navigation feature has arrived in 20 more countries. The expansion makes turn-by-turn navigation available to more African, Caribbean and South American nations, along with Sri Lanka and Nepal in Asia. It also looks like they're getting the whole enchilada, including bus, taxi and walking/biking routes. Of course, those who've been usign Navigation regularly know its instructions aren't always right (say aye if it's led you to the middle of nowhere before), but it's still a free and decent option. Check out the list of countries the service now supports, as spotted by Android Police on its support page, after the break.

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Remember the French law that, if passed, would make life impossible for companies like Uber, LeCab and Allocab? Last night the country's national assembly gave a Gallic thumbs-up to the rule. The biggest change is that drivers are now banned from sharing their GPS location, preventing customers from being able to hail the nearest cab from their phone. If there is an upside, however, it's that the late amendment that required Uber drivers to return "home" after each trip was shot down at the last minute. We won't bore you with the more minor details, but the TL;DR version is that the balance of power is back with France's entrenched Taxi monopoly. If we were in the mood, we'd make some sort of joke about a country with such a history of revolution is now slavishly enforcing the status-quo...

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The best thing about iOS 8 isn't continuity texting or a liberated keyboard -- it's that it'll give you rock hard abs. Which is exactly what you need if you're going to pull off any of Under Armour's skin-tight clothing. The sports brand wants to help you along with that, and has just updated its suite of apps (the popular MapMy... franchise it bought) to include unified activity tracking. This means if you have compatible hardware (like Jawbone's UP, or a Withings Pulse) or an iPhone with an M7/M8 chip in it, you can fold all your activity data into the one MapMyFitness app. This also means you won't get dupes any more if you were already tracking with the app and a tracker separately. Already working on those biceps by lifting your fancy new iPhone 6 Plus? Good, because the apps have also been given a digital nip and tuck to look extra buff on the new larger displays.

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Privacy. Sometimes we all crave a little. "Bocchi tent" is a 1.3 x 1.3-meter, soft-cornered cube that maker Bibi Lab reckons offers the "ultimate gaming space." With a slender gossamer wall between you and the rest of humanity, there's a degree of sensorial blockage, but we could, obviously, still hear the din of the Tokyo Game Show floors -- headphones will be necessary if you're looking to block out Other People. (The computer inside didn't even have any games! What a waste.)

With all the space-age science of a pop-up tent, open up the storage pouch and the temporary gaming den makes itself -- you'll just have to add the furniture (and well, gaming hardware), yourself. The tent is set to retail for 5,000 yen in Japan -- and if you're particularly taken with the idea of your own flatpack Internet Cafe, at least it should fit in your suitcase.

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